After the sun sets in Putian, thousands of bikes carrying fake sneakers hit the streets. The lace-up black market is no secret in Putian, and it's where you can find Chan, a vendor with a knack for getting high-quality pairs off the streets and into the hands of hypebeasts on the other side of the globe. With rubber, he struck gold. I've spoken to some of our customers some of them are high school students some are college students university students. So yeah these are our main crowd you generally, Chan told VICE News. It's usually the kids themselves were very resourceful. They understand about replicas they understand that these are high-quality sneakers and they come finding you saying, hey I'd like to buy some high-quality replicas from you. And while vendors are subject to police raids and potential lawsuits, Chan has been able to stay afloat. These days, the only thing slowing his business down is nitpicky sneakerheads. Unfortunately, it's just the hard and fast rules of doing business. You meet difficult customers. You'll meet cheaters, you meet scammers who will be out there to cheat you off a pair of shoes, Chan said. So, unfortunately, this kind of thing happens, especially when you're on a public domain like the Internet. VICE News met up with Chan at his headquarters to see how his business is racing ahead. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


Filthy Frank is the embodiment of everything a person should not be. That’s not an evaluation or an opinion. It’s the first sentence of the “about” section of his YouTube channel. That said, though, it’s pretty accurate. Frank’s videos feature him “cooking” himself in a tub full of ramen, eating a cake made out of hair, and jumping onto strangers’ sandwiches in a park. And after a few years of being an internet anti-icon, he wants to leave the filth behind and become a musician, under his real name, Joji. Some of his fans aren’t too happy about this. VICE News hung out with him for a day to see if he’ll be able to make the transition from video troll to true artist. This segment originally aired on November 3, 2017, on VICE News Tonight on HBO. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


London consistently nabs a top spot on lists ranking the world’s most expensive cities. Along with rent, home prices are also on the rise and Londoners are feeling the pinch. So what does it take to get by in London? We stepped into the daily life of Aaron Christian, a freelance commercial director born and raised in the city. “The idea of attempting to own a house has become very unrealistic and I don’t think that’s really going to change so I’m definitely more open to living in another part of Europe.” Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


Police in several cities across the U.S. are trying to put a stop to the groups of men waging paintball battles as a part of PaintballsUpGunsDown​ — an anti-gun violence campaign police are calling misguided. Detroit Police Chief James Craig said the PaintballsUpGunsDown movement has gotten out of control and could backfire if officers mistake a paintball gun for a real firearm. The grassroots movement first gained traction on social media in early April as a proposed way to resolve conflicts with paint instead of bullets. Since then, participants from Atlanta to Detroit have engaged in full blown paintball wars on city streets, with as many as 50 shooters taking aim at each other at once, hitting innocent bystanders and marking up cars and homes. Over the last week, police in Detroit started making arrests for destruction of property. Paintballers say they're being targeted for being young and black and that cleaning up paint is a lot better than picking up dead bodies. Watch Next: Gun Vloggers Are Flipping Out At Youtube's Crackdown On Their Videos - Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


50 years ago today, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of Loving -- Mildred and Richard Loving, who successfully sued the state of Virginia, forcing it to recognize their interracial marriage. That landmark case overturned laws against interracial marriages all across the country. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


When they infiltrated three morning news programs by passing themselves off as a hilariously un-athletic strongman duo, Brooklyn comedians Nick Prueher and Joe Pickett were not the first people to prank TV News. Left-leaning activists The Yes Men famously infiltrated BBC, and right-wing provocateur James O'Keefe unsuccessfully attempted to plant a false story in the Washington Post. But Prueher and Pickett, who run the Found Footage Festival, have no overt political agenda and are happy to simply interrupt news programming with the absurd or profane. Out of embarrassment or pragmatism, media companies generally avoid legal retaliation after getting pranked. Yet when Prueher and Pickett pranked Gray Television, the company sued, kicking off a battle over free speech, comedy, and how easy it can be get past TV bookers. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


Scott Dozier is scheduled to become the first death row inmate in the United States to be executed with the synthetic opioid fentanyl on Wednesday, and he’s fine with that. “I think it’s awesome. I mean, it’s killing people all over the place,” the convicted murderer said of the drug, in an exclusive interview with VICE News from Ely State Prison in Nevada. “You guys get pharmaceutical grade fentanyl and just bang me up man. Use a shit ton.” Watch Next: Should Firing Squads Replace Lethal Injections? - Read More about Scott Dozier's case here - Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


“Good Mythical Morning” is the most popular daily show on YouTube, and it’s getting even bigger. With over 12 million subscribers, and 3.7 billion total views, the show’s hosts Rhett McLaughlin and Link Neal are an integral part of their fans’ weekday mornings. And thanks to YouTube funding, the show has recently transformed from 10 minutes of the hosts sitting on chairs made out of marshmallows and eating weird food to a much bigger variety show production. Each morning’s show is now about 25 minutes of musical performances, celebrity guest stars, and even more weird food. That shift makes McLaughlin and Neal attractive for advertisers, especially because their content is family-friendly — assuming you’re okay with watching people eat congealed blood and scorpions. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


David Pilgrim, a Black sociologist, runs the Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia out of the small, white, Trump-voting town of Big Rapids, MI. With the help of private donors like Chuck and Ward, an elderly gay couple, Pilgrim believes that sharing his expansive collection can change the way racism is perceived in the United States. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


Over the past 20 years, Franco Loja and Arjan Roskam, known as the Kings of Cannabis, have made millions of dollars scouring the world for unique strains of weed to breed and then sell. Now, they've turned their sights on Equatorial Africa, specifically the Democratic Republic of the Congo, as their next gold mine — and a way to revolutionize the cannabis industry. Equatorial Africa is one the best preserved because of the wars, the lack of infrastructure, political unrest. All these situations created isolation there, Loja explained. So that's where we're going. Loja and Roskam built their global powerhouse on inbred strains of cannabis called landraces that they've collected from all over the world — Argentina, Australia, and Brazil, just to name a few spots. Without these strains, the duo's various breeding enterprises, Amsterdam coffeeshops, and even distribution centers wouldn't exist. VICE News met up with the “Kings of Cannabis” for a trip to the Democratic Republic of the Congo to hunt for one of the rarest species of Cannabis yet, the original Congolese landrace. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network: VICEonHBO


“I gotta do like, I gotta do a long time.” This is what it’s really like to be a kid in prison. VICE on HBO returns for its sixth season with “Raised in the System,” an extended special season premiere featuring Emmy-nominated actor Michael Kenneth Williams as he embarks on a personal journey to expose the root of the American mass incarceration crisis: the juvenile justice system. “Raised in the System” offers a frank and unflinching look at people caught up in the system, exploring why the country’s mass incarceration problem cannot be fixed without first addressing the juvenile justice problem, and investigates community efforts that are resulting in drastic drops in crime and incarceration. See more on Raised In The System on @HBO NOW and learn more at VICEonHBO Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


Last month, ISIS-linked militants attempted to establish South East Asia's first Islamic State caliphate on the southern Philippines island of Mindanao. What followed was a bid from the Philippines armed forces to crush the militants and reestablish order. VICE News gained exclusive access to embed with the Philippines special forces to learn about the realities of war on the front lines of Marawi. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


China imports more recyclable goods than any other country in the world. But earlier this year, China stopped accepting a long list of imported plastic and paper waste, and implemented much stricter guidelines for what it's willing to take in. The dramatic policy change is part of a national campaign to reduce the country’s carbon footprint, but China's decision to no longer be the trash collector for the rest of the world is causing major problems for U.S. waste processing operations. Across the U.S., recyclers had been accustomed to sending major portions of their paper and plastic to China, but now they're scrambling to find other takers. Already, more than a dozen states have started to giving companies waivers to throw out recyclables, including Massachusetts, where more than 4,000 tons of single-stream recyclables and more than 10,000 tons of glass have been sent to landfills. VICE News traveled to Massachusetts to visit a processor that used to have an average of a few dozen one-ton cubes of recyclables sitting around and now has thousands. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


Despite having four young children, in August of 2016, Robert Wood quit his job at a renowned violin shop in order to make violins from a converted shed in his backyard. He was able to make the leap because his wife, university admissions counselor Deborah Higham Wood, supports their family financially while Robert builds his business. Robert initially felt guilty for not providing an income while he got Heartwood Violins off the ground, and he still struggles with the societal expectation that a man (and not a woman) provides for his family. Vice News met Robert and Deborah to find out how they overcame ingrained patriarchal expectations so that Rob could follow his passions and their family can thrive. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


Movie theater attendance is the lowest it’s been since 1995. But a company called MoviePass is trying to fix that. Mitch Lowe is the CEO of MoviePass– and as the co-founder of Netflix, he’s partially to blame for movie theaters underperforming. “You know people have got to get out of this cocooning phase and into the experiential, “ says Lowe. A subscription to MoviePass lets you see a movie a day, for ten bucks a month. The math is simple: when MoviePass started in 2011, it cost up to 50 dollars per month, depending on where you lived. At the time, the average price of a movie ticket in the US was about $8 dollars, meaning you’d have to see seven movies a month to get the most out of your subscription. But when the company dropped prices to $10 last August, the price to see one movie evened out to about the same price as the pass itself, and you got to see an unlimited number of movies a month. Not surprisingly– subscriptions jumped from twenty thousand to over three million. But Lowe wants to disrupt your movie-going experience altogether. “The reason we're able to offer you at extraordinarily low price is because we're going to monetize the data to sell you things to create kind of an Open Table for your “night at the movies,” says Lowe, “So we’ll be working with restaurants and bars and build deals.and of course we’ll make a percentage of the revenue that you would spend there.” Despite Lowe’s confidence in the business model, the stock of MoviePass’s parent company, a big data company called Helios and Matheson (HMNY), is tanking to a current low of $00.11 a share. HMNY has unveiled a plan to raise a billion dollars from investors, and do what’s called a reverse stock split, which could temporarily boost the stock price. Shareholders will meet and write MoviePass's next scene–or its ending– on Monday. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


Imagine getting from Los Angeles to San Francisco in just about 30 minutes. That kind of high-speed travel is the end-game of SpaceX's Hyperloop, and teams around the world are working hard to come up with the right pod for the job. Three such teams gathered at SpaceX headquarters in Hawthorne, California, last Sunday to compete in the third SpaceX Hyperloop Pod Competition. From a starting group of 20 teams, these three qualified to launch on SpaceX’s Hyperloop track. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


Molossia. Slobovia. The Aerican Empire. If you don’t remember any of these countries from geography class, you’re not alone. They are all “micronations,” self-declared sovereign states not formally recognized by any official authority (other than each other). This summer, representatives from 27 of these would-be fiefdoms gathered for a summit in Dunwoody, Georgia. While several of these micronations claim that they are their own autonomous countries, many are created as a political protest, for artistic reasons or as a social experiment. MicroCon 2017 was hosted by Veronica Boritz, who also identifies as Queen Anastasia von Elphberg of Ruritania. The event, which lasted four days, included multiple outings for the micronational leaders, a symposium with speeches on subjects like “Micronational post system” and “Women in micronations: Starting your own or supporting your dictator husband.” Watch more VICE News videos here: Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


After nearly 20 minutes of nail biting bidding on Wednesday night, Leonardo da Vinci’s painting Salvator Mundi, shattered the world record for the most expensive work of art ever sold at auction. Including fees, the 500 year old rare masterpiece sold for $450.3 million. Some questioned the authenticity of the painting as truly Da Vinci but with a price tag that far surpassed initial estimates the concern now seems irrelevant. Before the sale, Vice News Tonight went to Christie's for a private viewing of Salvator Mundi with contemporary Brazilian artist Vik Muniz. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


North Korea celebrated its 70th birthday this weekend with a carefully choreographed two-hour long parade — making out to be a spectacle that showed off how its citizens and its military fall in line. But this year’s parade was different. The inter-continental missiles that could hit the U.S were nowhere to be seen. And while this only shows that North Korea's Kim Jong-un is going for a less threatening image, the White House saw this as “a sign of good faith”. This event was designed for the world’s news cameras and has been used in the past by leader Kim Jong-un as an excuse to display the country’s weaponry. The crowd included Li Zhanzhu, head of China’s parliament, and French actor Gerard Depardieu. VICE News was on the ground in Pyongyang for the celebrations. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


One third of all Oklahoma school districts are now operating on a four-day schedule. Oklahoma has cut education funding per student more than any other state over the last 8 years. In the past, Oklahoma has compensated for funding cuts with oil revenue, but oil prices have declined in recent years. “Teachers have been reluctant,” principal Nathan Gray told VICE News correspondent Roberto Ferdman. “You’re now forced to cover all the curriculum, all the testing that’s required by the state, in four days.” In Oklahoma’s Noble school district, all schools are closed on Fridays to save money, one principal oversees two elementary schools to avoid hiring a second administrator, and the district superintendent also works bus duty. Gray says a four-day school week isn’t what anyone wanted, but it was the only way to cope with the cuts. “This was our best way to survive.” Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


Melissa Cross is a classically trained singer and actress. But it’s her work with metal bands that’s the reason for her success, and her nom de guerre: the “Queen of Scream.” The 60-year-old has worked with some of the biggest names in hardcore, from Slipknot to Slayer and Megadeth. As America’s heavy bands hit the road this summer, Cross is in demand--and takes VICE News backstage at the Vans Warped Tour stop in San Antonio. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


On the Sea Islands along the coasts of South Carolina and Georgia, a painful chapter of American history is playing out again. These islands are home to the Gullah or Geechee people, the descendants of enslaved Africans who were brought to work at the plantations that once ran down the southern Atlantic coast. After the Civil War, many former slaves on the Sea Islands bought portions of the land where their descendants have lived and farmed for generations. That property, much of it undeveloped waterfront land, is now some of the most expensive real estate in the country. But the Gullah are now discovering that land ownership on the Sea Islands isn’t quite what it seemed. Local landowners are struggling to hold on to their ancestral land as resort developers with deep pockets exploit obscure legal loopholes to force the property into court-mandated auctions. These tactics have successfully fueled a tourism boom that now attracts more than 2 million visitors a year. Gullah communities have all but disappeared, replaced by upscale resorts and opulent gated developments that new locals — golfers, tourists, and mostly white retirees — fondly call “plantations.” Faced with an epic case of déjà vu, the Gullah are scrambling for solutions as their livelihood and culture vanish, one waterfront mansion at a time. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


Houston should have seen this one coming. In fact, they did. VICE News meets the citizens and researchers who said they should have been more prepared. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


As a major stronghold of ISIS in its brutal sweep across Iraq, the city of Mosul has been central in the war to defeat the terror group. Iraqi forces began their campaign to crush ISIS in October 2016 just outside of Erbil, with a coalition of Kurdish peshmerga forces, and Western advisory allies. It was a long and arduous process of slowly advancing first from town to town along the Nineveh plains toward the city and then from block to block as they worked to liberate sectors of the city. VICE’s Aris Roussinos embedded with Iraqi forces as they began the campaign to retake Mosul. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


At the 2017 Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) this Monday, trade talks were at the top of the agenda, but Trump also took the opportunity to congratulate Duterte for his strong stance on terror, and the liberation of the city of Marawi last month. Militants aligned with ISIS took hold of the city in May and what was supposed to be a two week battle turned into a five month long siege, where the Philippine military (assisted by U.S. intelligence, weapons and funding of 13.6 million dollars) struggled to take down the highly equipped and skilled opposition. But, the battle is far from over. This is a Muslim majority region, prone to sectarian violence and anti-government sentiment for close to a decade. Now the state will have to re-build trust within a shaken and fragile community, as residents cautiously return to the outskirts of the city. VICE News was there at the height of the battle in June and returned to count the cost of war. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


Six Colorado inmates sentenced to decades in prison as teenagers in the ’80s and ’90s thought they would never get out. During their 20-plus years behind bars, technology has changed the outside world dramatically. The criminal justice system has changed, too, becoming more forgiving of people who commit crimes as juveniles. Since 2005, the U.S. Supreme Court has slowly chipped away at harsh, mandatory sentences for kids, ultimately finding in 2012 that it’s unconstitutional to sentence juveniles to life without parole. This year, Colorado started an early-release program for people convicted as juveniles who have already served 20 years of their sentences. To get ready for life on the outside, inmates in the three-year program use virtual reality to prepare for stressful situations and practice skills they never learned as teens, like doing laundry and grocery shopping. VICE News visited the medium-security Fremont Correctional Facility as they used VR for the first time. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


Peru is the number one producer of counterfeit US dollars in the world. In 2015, just over 16 million forged bills seized in the US were of Peruvian origin, according to the US Secret Service. Millions of counterfeit euros and Peruvian soles have also been seized by police in Peru. The forged dollars are finished by hand, giving them an exceptional quality which has earned the country its top spot as leader of this illicit global trade. And for the criminal gangs counterfeit money is cheaper to produce than cocaine. Fernando Lucena goes undercover for VICE News to expose the illegal trade in counterfeit money and gets rare access to the criminal forgers who show us how these bills are made. Watch Peru's War on Drugs - Read Peru's Booming Cocaine Business Is Turning It Into Latin America's Newest Narco State - Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


Even with all the technology at the U.S. government’s disposal, the best way to gather data from a hurricane is still the hard way: flying into the storm in a propeller plane. That’s exactly what the men and women of 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron do. Better known as the “Hurricane Hunters,” this all-reserve Air Force unit is tasked with piloting their WC-130J aircraft directly into the eye of a hurricane. VICE News secured a ride with the Hurricane Hunters as they flew into the eye of Hurricane Irma, the most powerful hurricane ever recorded in the Atlantic. The Hurricane Hunters don’t fly into storms for fun. During their flight an array of instruments collect and transmit data used to predict how active storms will develop, and move. Read more: CORRECTION Sept. 11, 2017, 3:30 p.m.: The title of Tech Sgt. Karen Moore is incorrect in this video. Her correct title is “Dropsonde Operator.” VICE News regrets the error. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


After ISIS and the airstrikes, the city of Raqqa is in near ruins. But that’s not stopping people from coming back. While the Syrian Democratic Forces defeated ISIS in their self-proclaimed capital, the battles left the city uninhabitable. VICE's Isobel Yeung travels to Raqqa and speaks with students who have witnessed all the chaos. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


The Sinaloa drug cartel is the largest cartel in the world, and it’s estimated to rake in $3 billion a year. VICE News visited Mexico’s Golden Triangle, the stronghold of the Sinaloa cartel, just days before the extradition of drug lord El Chapo. A decade ago, Mexico declared war on the country’s drug cartels, deploying the military to dismantle them. That means destroying their drug crops. “They do the destruction by hand and also with fumigation with air force planes,” Cmdr. Cesar Augusto Bonilla told VICE News in the “Golden Triangle,” which is notorious for its marijuana and poppy production. “They collect everything that’s been destroyed, and continue to incinerate it.” These types of raids are supposed to cut into the cartel’s profits, just as the arrest of kingpins like El Chapo are supposed to cripple trafficking networks by removing their top commanders. But even after his decade-long imprisonment, and now as he faces extradition, the organization El Chapo built is very much intact. “Nothing has changed here,” the local boss said. “Drug trafficking will never end.” Read: “We visited a hidden poppy field the Sinaloa Cartel uses to produce heroin” - Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


When Shin Song Hyuk was three years old, an American couple in Detroit adopted him and moved him from South Korea to the United States. His new family changed his name to Adam, but did not fill out the basic forms that guarantee citizenship for international adoptees. This meant Adam was an undocumented immigrant. Nobody knows exactly how many international adoptees grow up undocumented due to negligence or clerical error, but given the difficulties of adopted life, many of them end up in trouble with the law, which, in turn, opens them up for deportation to homelands they do not remember and cultures which are completely foreign to them. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


On Wednesday at 2:30 AM, Uber driver Terri White left her home in Stockton, California, and drove 83 miles to San Francisco for work. She wouldn’t be home until Friday afternoon. White naps in her car between rush hours and heats up her lunch at a local gas station. She says one in five Uber drivers she meets sleeps in their car. “I love people, I love being able to breathe the air, I’m not confined to a desk, and I can do what I want,” White told VICE News correspondent Nellie Bowles. “I don’t have to wait for someone to relieve me for a break or a lunch, I just do it.” Uber’s biggest competitor, Lyft, locks drivers out of the platform after they’ve worked 14 hours in a day. Uber does not. Watch what its like to be an Uber driver in a city you can't afford to live in. Read: Uber is trying to convince Europe's highest court that it's not a taxi service - Read: Uber drivers discriminate against black users, new study says - Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


President Trump's new Afghanistan strategy will see up to 4,000 additional troops deployed to fight the deadliest Taliban army to date in the now 16-year-old conflict. But very few of them will see ground combat. That's because the war is being fought mainly by Afghan soldiers on the ground, supported by U.S. airpower in the form of drones or F-16s. VICE NEWS spent time with U.S. and Afghan forces as they try to beat back a Taliban resurgence that's seen the group now control or contest more territory in Afghanistan than at any time since the beginning of the war. We accompanied an Afghan-led counter-insurgency operation deep into Helmand province, where local forces fight day and night to push the Taliban back using heavy artillery and mine-clearance teams that dig out IEDs with their bare hands. As top U.S. officials laud recent results on the battlefield, Afghan soldiers say the Taliban they’re fighting is stronger now than they’ve been in years. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


Subscribe to VICE News here: The VICE News Capsule is a news roundup that looks beyond the headlines. Today: Tensions rise between locals and foreign shopkeepers in South African city of Soweto, Chile will reopen its investigation into the death of Nobel Prize-winning poet Pablo Neruda, El Salvador grants amnesty to woman accused of having an abortion, and Libya's political crisis has its residents struggling to keep the lights on. SOUTH AFRICA Violence and Looting at Foreign-Owned Shops Near Johannesburg Two people were killed on Thursday during clashes between locals and foreign shopkeepers in Soweto. The unrest was sparked by the shooting death of a teenager during a botched robbery attempt. CHILE Government Reopens Inquiry Into Death of Poet Pablo Neruda Officials say there's reason to believe the Nobel Laureate was poisoned in the days after the 1973 coup. EL SALVADOR Amnesty Granted to Woman Accused of Having an Abortion Carmen Guadalupe Vasquez was serving a 30-year sentence for aggravated murder. She was charged following the death of her baby and was initially accused of trying to have an abortion, which is banned in the country. LIBYA Ongoing Fighting Causing Power Cuts ​Families are forced to buy generators to cope with energy shortages as the government struggles to meet demand.​ Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


Subscribe to VICE News here: The VICE News Capsule is a news roundup that looks beyond the headlines. Today: Peruvian government evacuates Amazonian villages following raid by indigenous tribe, UN transports food aid to South Sudanese civilians by the Nile River, dozens of rare seals mysteriously die off UK beaches, and displaced Afghan families face a harsh winter in makeshift camps. PERU Tribal Attack Forces Evacuation of Amazonian Communities Around 200 men of the Mashco-Piro tribe raided a village for food and tools last week. SOUTH SUDAN UN Begins Aid Delivery Using Nile Route Sudan's border had been closed since South Sudan declared independence in 2011, forcing shipments to be delivered by air. UNITED KINGDOM Mysterious Seal Deaths Worry Conservationists Wildlife experts have not yet determined why more than 40 rare gray seals have died off Cornish beaches over the last two months. AFGHANISTAN Difficult Winter Ahead for Displaced Families in Makeshift Camps ​Thousands have fled their homes as the Taliban retake areas previously cleared by foreign forces.​ Check out the VICE News beta for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram:


Permafrost refers to frozen soil and water that covers nearly a quarter of the Northern Hemisphere. With climate change warming the Arctic at an alarming rate, the permafrost is beginning to thaw. While this phenomenon can wreak havoc on infrastructure and transportation in places like Northern Alaska and Siberia, the real danger is the release of carbon and methane gas. There are more greenhouse gases trapped in these deep layers of permafrost than all human fossil fuel emissions released since the industrial age. Due to permafrost thaw, that trapped carbon is starting to escape into the atmosphere, creating a warming feedback loop that will make climate change even worse, and cause the permafrost to thaw even faster. If this continues unchecked, scientists warn we could be on the verge of awakening the sleeping giant of climate change. But some innovative climate pioneers are changing that. With the use of both cutting edge genetics, and an experiment that relies on geo-engineering, there is hope that the permafrost thaw can be slowed. VICE Correspondent, Ben Anderson, travels across the Arctic to see the devastating impact of thawing permafrost, and the astonishing solution that might keep it frozen. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


Question: Who’s better than President Tump at “loving the Bible,” “respecting women,” or knowing “the game”? Answer: Nobody, at least according to Trump. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


Subscribe to VICE News here: The VICE News Capsule is a news roundup that looks beyond the headlines. Today: African migrants drown off Libya's coast, Egyptian activist released on bail ahead of retrial, Yemeni army brigade appears to endorse Shia Houthi rebel movement, and police reportedly arrest dozens of protesters at sit-ins in Islamabad. LIBYA Migrants Drown After Boat Overturns Coast guard retrieves the bodies of dozens of people trying to reach Europe's shores. EGYPT Activist Released on Bail Ahead of Retrial Alaa Abdel Fattah is being prosecuted under the country's draconian protest law. YEMEN Army Brigade Expresses Solidarity With Houthi Rebels Video obtained by the Associated Press appears to show commander at base outside the capital speaking in support of the movement. PAKISTAN Police Arrest Protesters at Islamabad Sit-Ins ​Opposition party says dozens detained in crackdown on demonstrations against Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif.​ Check out the VICE News beta for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram:


Subscribe to VICE News here: Last summer, Americans were stunned by images of children and families from Central America turning themselves in at the US-Mexico border. More migrants are now coming from the Honduran city of San Pedro Sula and surrounding areas than anywhere else in Central America. The society there has yet to recover from a 2009 coup that crippled the economy and unleashed extreme levels of violence and inequality. In our latest episode of Immigrant America, VICE News traveled to San Pedro Sula — the most violent and second largest city in Honduras — to find out why so many families and young people are risking it all to migrate illegally to the US. Mexico Is Implementing New Measures to Curb Influx of US-Bound Central American Migrants: Check out more episodes of Immigrant America: Check out the VICE News beta for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram:


North Koreans living in Los Angeles had a lot to worry about, even before the Trump-Kim summit was announced. Los Angeles’ Koreatown hosts the largest population of North Koreans in the United States. But while iving in an area where so many residents also speak their language can make easing into American society less daunting, they can also face discrimination — from other Koreans. “Some North Koreans, they hide the fact that they're from North Korea,” says Sarah Cho, founder of an organization that helps defectors start their new lives in the US. She says that while many South Koreans are curious and helpful to newly arrived North Korean immigrants, others can be abusive. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


When Lehman Brothers declared bankruptcy ten years ago on Friday, the question on everyone’s minds was simple: “Who’s next?” If a pillar of Wall Street worth hundreds of billions of dollars just months before couldn’t be trusted with the public's money, then nowhere was safe. Panicked investors rushed for the door, banks refused to lend to each other, and money market funds began to collapse. “I describe it as an economic Pearl Harbor,” Warren Buffett, the legendary investor of Berkshire Hathaway, told VICE News. “It was something we hadn’t seen before. Even the 1929 panic was nothing like this. I mean, the system stopped.“ Buffett had a front row seat to the global crisis even before the Bush Administration took up the struggle. He had been approached by Lehman’s CEO Dick Fuld for emergency capital earlier in the summer, and after it failed, he found himself courted by other teetering investment banks desperate for capital. His $5 billion investment in Goldman Sachs saved the firm, and netted him billions. He credits the Bush administration, led by Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson, with helping to prevent a second Great Depression. “When they realized the gravity of what was happening, we were having a run on the United States, maybe a run on the world, they stepped up,” Buffett said. He’s not convinced, however, that the financial community's takeaway from its brush with financial Armageddon will prevent future disaster. “Humans will continue to behave foolishly and sometimes en masse. And that doesn’t change. We get smarter but we don’t get wiser, Buffett said. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


Subscribe to VICE News here: The VICE News Capsule is a news roundup that looks beyond the headlines.​ Today: female suicide bombers attack market in northeast Nigeria, Israel allows cement trucks into Gaza for reconstruction, Colombia's FARC rebels release two of five captured soldiers, and Hong Kong riot police arrest dozens after clearance of protest site. NIGERIA Female Suicide Bombers Target Northeastern City Islamist militant group Boko Haram is suspected of carrying the attack out. GAZA Israel Allows Building Materials in For Reconstruction Efforts An agreement brokered by the UN seeks to ensure Gazan families can rebuild their homes but gives Israel the power to approve and veto projects. COLOMBIA FARC Releases Two Soldiers in Hopes of Restarting Peace Talks A spokesman for the group says an army general held captive could be released by the weekend. HONG KONG Police Clash With Demonstrators As They Clear Protest Site ​Authorities used tear gas and pepper spray on crowds of people attempting to erect new barricades, and around 80 protesters were arrested. ​ Check out the VICE News beta for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram:


It’s been a few months since VICE News has been in eastern Ukraine, and violence in the Donetsk and Luhansk regions has died down — suggesting that the Minsk ceasefire deal is finally sticking. VICE News correspondent Simon Ostrovsky travels from what was once the front line in Luhansk to surrounding towns that were once under constant bombardment to speak with soldiers, government officials, and residents about their hopes for the future. Watch: Rebel Soldiers Hold the Buffer Zone: Russian Roulette (Dispatch 109) - Watch: On The DNR Frontline: Ukraine's Failed Ceasefire (Part 1) - Read: Ukraine's President Bans Journalists From The Country — Then Changes His Mind - Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


It’s extremely difficult for anyone from the outside to make it in Japan, and it’s even harder in the entertainment industry. Dexter Thomas went to Tokyo to meet one Nigerian-American comedian who’s now on Japanese TV every day. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


The VICE News Capsule is a news roundup that looks beyond the headlines. Today: Al Shabaab gunmen massacre at least 48 people in coastal Kenyan town, Spanish police arrest eight men accused of recruiting ISIS fighters, India opens first crisis center for female rape and abuse victims, and Japanese whalers complete first hunt since an earlier ruling on its legality. Subscribe to VICE News here: KENYA Dozens Killed in Suspected Al Shabaab Attack on Coastal Town Some of the victims were shop owners and patrons gathered to watch a World Cup match. SPAIN Police Arrest Alleged ISIS Recruiters One of the men is a former Guantanamo Bay prison detainee. INDIA First Women's Crisis Center Opens The facility will provide medical and legal assistance to victims of rape, domestic abuse, and others. JAPAN First Hunt Since UN Court Ruling on Whaling Legality The International Court of Justice's March decision only forbade Japan from whaling in the Antarctic region. Check out the VICE News beta for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr:


Since the 2016 election, the notion of hacking has become inextricably intertwined with one country: Russia. But cyber crimes emanating from Russia and Russian speaking countries have been around for years, fueling attacks like a 2014 data breach of more than 500 million Yahoo! accounts and a scheme that stole 160 million credit cards from American corporations. If someone wants to hack you, they're gonna be able to former NSA hacker Patrick Wardle told VICE News. And if a Russian wants to hack you, they've certainly got the tools: A 2016 report by the Department of Homeland Security confirmed that 75 percent of all ransomware was created in Russia. The apparent lack of ethical consideration in the buildup of Russian information technology and cyber security is rooted in decades of technical education under Stalin, who launched polytechnic schools to train engineers for his military-industrial complex. Russia's cyber capabilities can now be used for just about everything, ranging from digital bank robberies to tampering with critical infrastructure. This is the website of a big online store. Kostya, an anonymous Russian hacker who agreed to show VICE News how easy it is to steal digital data. I can get into their configurations and download their client database. Spurred by the trillions of dollars online and in a generation raised on the web, hacking from Russia and around the world is flourishing. VICE News went to Moscow to see the country’s expert hackers in action. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network: VICEonHBO


Subscribe to VICE News here: Around midnight on May 3, Dana Seetahal, a prominent attorney and former senator in Trinidad and Tobago, had just left a casino in the capital of Port of Spain when her vehicle was stopped by another car blocking the road. A van pulled up alongside and let loose a burst of gunfire, killing her in a well orchestrated hit. Her murder was one of approximately 170 that have occurred in the Caribbean nation so far this year, putting it on course for one of the highest murder rates in the world. The country saw only 93 murders in 1999. Last year, there were 407. VICE News visited the slums of Port of Spain and spoke with police, activists, community leaders, and gangsters to understand the country's decade-plus spike in killings. Many of the murders are attributed to ruthless and politically connected street gangs who control territories that are sometimes no larger than a city block. The gangs fight over lucrative government contracts meant to provide social services and combat unemployment. But gang violence is merely a symptom of a bigger problem. Trinidad has become an important stop for drugs headed to West Africa and the United States. Many observers point to the big fish — the nameless political and business elites who are behind drug trafficking and the culture of endemic corruption and murder that come with it. They are accused of turning a country rich in oil and gas deposits into their own personal narco-state, fostering impunity through a web of bribes and murders. Unlike the profits from the energy industry, however, this phenomenon trickles all the way down to the street level. Check out VICE News' coverage of the situation in Venezuela: Check out the VICE News beta for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr:


There was a time when most Republicans — and a lot of Democrats — thought New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie would be president of the United States one day. No one thinks that now. What happened to the man who redefined what it meant to be a Republican? How did he go from some of the highest approval ratings in America to some of the lowest? Using his rising and falling poll numbers as a guide, VICE News set out on a road trip across New Jersey. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


Two Baltimore police officers are on trial this week in federal court for some of this worst misconduct imaginable. Detectives Daniel Hersl and Marcus Taylor were members of Baltimore’s Gun Trace Task Force, an elite group of plainclothes officers expected to get the worst firearms and offenders off the city streets. Eight of the nine men on the task force have been accused of a range of organized crime-level charges that range from robbery and extortion, to faking evidence, planting drugs, dealing drugs, and other serious crimes. 6 of the officers, Sergeants Thomas Allers and Wayne Jenkins, and Detectives Momodu Gondo, Evodio Hendrix, Maurice Ward, and Jemell Rayam, have all pleaded guilty. It’s a staggering fall: the Gun Trace Task Force was created by the city in 2007 with the explicit goal of fighting crime and reducing the city’s rising murder rate. For a while, city leaders saw the task force as a huge success, celebrating the firearms and drugs the men had confiscated. Today, many Baltimore residents consider the task force’s crimes the biggest scandal in recent memory. Freddie Gray’s 2015 death in police custody and the resulting riots dominated years of headlines, but these officers’s misconduct was the low frequency chaos only people in Baltimore’s most vulnerable communities could hear. Subscribe to VICE News here: Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


Subscribe to VICE News here: The VICE News Capsule is a news roundup that looks beyond the headlines. Today: Anti-government demonstrations grow in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, amateur video appears to show aftermath of Syrian air strikes on village controlled by the Islamic State, U.S. law enforcement agencies are using a radar that can detect if you're home through the walls, and Crimea's water shortage has zoo animals parched. D.R. CONGO Demonstrations Continue Against Proposed Electoral Law The powerful Catholic Church has condemned the reform, which the opposition claims would only serve to extend President Joseph Kabila's rule. SYRIA Aftermath of Government Raid on Militant-Controlled Territory Medics say at least 65 people are dead after an air strike on a cattle market in the northeast village of Khansaa. U.S.A. Police Radar Used by 50 Agencies Can ‘See’ Inside Homes Using radio waves, the Range-R device can detect the slightest of movements. Privacy advocates aren't pleased. CRIMEA Water Shortage Threatens Zoo Animals Reservoir levels on the peninsula have fallen and have left lions, tigers, and bears are at risk of going thirsty. Check out VICE News for more: Follow VICE News here: Facebook: Twitter: Tumblr: Instagram: More videos from the VICE network:


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